On Religion

Kahlil Gibran

Have I spoken this day of aught else?
Is not religion all deeds and all reflection,
And that which is neither deed nor reflection, but a wonder and a
surprise ever springing in the soul, even while the hands hew
the stone or tend the loom?
Who can separate his faith from his actions, or his belief from his
occupations?
Who can spread his hours before him, saying, “This for God and
this for myself; This for my soul, and this other for my body?”
All your hours are wings that beat through space from self to self.
He who wears his morality but as his best garment were better
naked.
The wind and the sun will tear no holes in his skin.
And he who defines his conduct by ethics imprisons his song-bird
in a cage.
The freest song comes not through bars and wires.
And he to whom worshipping is a window, to open but also to
shut, has not yet visited the house of his soul whose windows are
from dawn to dawn.

Your daily life is your temple and your religion.
Whenever you enter into it take with you your all.
Take the plough and the forge and the mallet and the lute,
The things you have fashioned in necessity or for delight.
For in revery you cannot rise above your achievements nor fall
lower than your failures.
And take with you all men:
For in adoration you cannot fly higher than their hopes nor
humble yourself lower than their despair.

And if you would know God be not therefore a solver of riddles.
Rather look about you and you shall see Him playing with your
children.
And look into space; you shall see Him walking in the cloud,
outstretching His arms in the lightning and descending in rain.
You shall see Him smiling in flowers, then rising and waving His
hands in trees.

Adapted from The Prophet
More from The Prophet can be found at Click Here!

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Music of Something Bigger Than Yourself

That prayer – and the word “one” – were integral to the Reb’s beliefs. One, as in the singular God. One, as in the Lord’s creation, Adam.

“Ask yourself, ‘Why did God create but one man?’ ” the Reb said, wagging a finger. “Why, if he meant for there to be faiths bickering with each other, didn’t he create that from the start? He created trees, right? Not one tree, countless trees. Why not the same with man?

“Because we are all from that one man – and all from that one God. That’s the message.”

Then why, I asked, is the world so fractured?

“Well, you can look at it this way. Would you want the world to all look alike? No. The genius of life is its variety.

“Even in our own faith, we have questions and answers, interpretations, debates. In Christianity, in Catholicism, in other faiths, the same thing – debates, interpretations. That is the beauty. It’s like being a musician. If you found the note, and you kept hitting that note all the time, you would go nuts. It’s the blending of the different notes that makes the music.”

The music of what?

“Of believing in something bigger than yourself.”

But what if someone from another faith won’t recognize yours? Or wants you dead for it?

“That is not faith. That is hate.” He sighed. “And if you ask me, God sits up there and cries when that happens.”

Extracted from Mitch Albom’s have a little faith, Page 160 – 161.

This paragraph inspires me to share with others, not confined only to religious views, also other perspectives and elements of life.

Viktor Frankl: Why to Believe in Others

This is Arsene Wenger

“We live in a world where democratic judgment is only in the present, and that’s why it’s very important to have directors who are strong enough to resist, as well to explain why they resist.”

Little by Little…

…We Are Creating Values that Could Well Last Long Enough. ∞